The Antibody Society Webinars

 

The Antibody Society hosts webinars on 4 key topics that relate to the research and development of antibodies.


Our “Antibody Discovery & Development” webinars inform and educate our members and the broader scientific community about scientific advances relating to antibody discovery and development.


In our “Adaptive Immune Receptor Repertoires” webinars, members of our Adaptive Immune Receptor Repertoire Community discuss use of next-generation sequencing technologies to study antibody/B-cell and T-cell receptor repertoires, which can expand understanding of immune repertoire dynamics in vaccinology, infectious diseases, autoimmunity, and cancer biology.


Our “Antibodies to Watch” webinars provide timely updates on events related to antibody therapeutics in late-stage development and regulatory review, and those that were recently approved.


Moderated by Dr. Simon Goodman, our “Antibody Validation” webinars are aimed especially at those beginning a career in biological sciences. In this series of 10 webinars, leaders in antibody research from industry and academia reflect on antibody reagent validation.

Webinars
Collapse Easy, fast, and practical AIRR analysis. Exploration of single-cell and bulk immune repertoire data in R using Immunarch with application to immunotherapy

In this webinar, Vadim I. Nazarov will demonstrate the applications of AIRR data analysis to immunotherapy development and how R package Immunarch simplifies this type of work. The webinar's goal is to enable listeners to apply AIRR bioinformatics to real-world problems and identify biomarkers that inform decision-making in pre-clinical and clinical studies. AIRR analysis has been a particularly challenging area of research since it is highly interdisciplinary. Immunarch R package helps standardize the analysis and provides quick access to advanced methods, letting you focus more on research rather than coding. Key topics covered on the webinar: TCR or BCR clonality and diversity as biomarkers of clinical activity in cellular immunotherapy studies, clonotype convergence and public clonotype analysis, annotation of clonotype associations with disease, V(D)J gene usage analysis, clonotype tracking to characterize CAR-T or TCR-T persistence and expansion, which inform the choice of optimal design for TCR-based immunotherapy.

Formats Available: Live Webcast
Original Seminar Date: October 07, 2021
Register HereRegister Here Easy, fast, and practical AIRR analysis. Exploration of single-cell and bulk immune repertoire data in R using Immunarch with application to immunotherapy
On Demand, Antibody Discovery & Development
Collapse #11 - Antibody Discovery in the Cloud: Using NGS to expand the universe of selectable antibodies (On Demand)
Antibody Discovery and Development (1)

The Specifica Generation 3 platform is able to generate 500-5000 different antibody clonotypes against targets of interest, with over 80% of selected antibodies having no measurable biophysical liabilities and 20% having subnanomolar affinities. The most common approach to selecting antibodies from display technologies involves low-throughput random colony screening. However, this misses many potential therapeutic leads, particularly when diversity is high. Specifica uses next generation sequencing (NGS) to build its libraries as well as characterize selection outputs. In order to fully exploit the universe of selectable antibodies, Specifica has developed a cloud-based software platform, designed exclusively for antibody engineers and bioinformaticians, to enable a streamlined identification of leads with broad epitope coverage. Application of this to selection outputs has increased the number of clonotype leads by five to ten fold over random colony screening, significantly expanding the explorable paratope space.

Formats Available: On-Demand, Live Webcast
Original Seminar Date: January 21, 2021
Register HereRegister Here #11 - Antibody Discovery in the Cloud: Using NGS to expand the universe of selectable antibodies (On Demand)
Collapse #12 - Ultra-fast development of an anti-COVID-19 antibody (On Demand)

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has spread all over the world in the past year and there is still no efficient treatment available for COVID-19, particularly for patients undergoing severe courses, which often lead to fatal consequences. Antiviral drugs such as virus-neutralizing antibody therapeutics are still urgently needed to save millions of lives. Corat Therapeutics developed a novel SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing, fully human antibody derived from convalescent patients. Ultra-fast development strategies shortened timelines from discovery to GMP manufactured material to less than 8 months. This was possible by parallelizing discovery and development steps, as well as performing crucial steps on risk. First-in-human studies were recently initiated. This webinar gives an overview of the challenges faced during discovery and development of the lead antibody, COR-101.

Formats Available: On-Demand, Live Webcast
Original Seminar Date: February 18, 2021
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
Register HereRegister Here #12 - Ultra-fast development of an anti-COVID-19 antibody (On Demand)
Collapse #13 - Deep mining of early antibody response in COVID-19 patients yields potent neutralizers and reveals high level of convergence (On Demand)

In this webinar, Dr. John McCafferty presents results from the deep-mining of the antibody repertoires of hospitalized COVID-19 patients using a combination of phage display technology and B cell receptor repertoire sequencing to isolate neutralizing antibodies and gain insights into the early antibody response. This comprehensive discovery approach yielded potent neutralizing antibodies with distinct mechanisms of action. In particular, a novel non-ACE2 receptor blocking antibody that is not expected to be affected by any of the major viral variants reported was identified. Potent neutralizing antibodies with near germline sequences within both the IgG and IgM pools at early stages of infection were also found. The study results highlight a highly convergent antibody response with the same sequences occurring both within this patient group and within the responses described in previously published anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody studies.

Formats Available: On-Demand
Original Seminar Date: March 18, 2021
Register HereRegister Here #13 - Deep mining of early antibody response in COVID-19 patients yields potent neutralizers and reveals high level of convergence (On Demand)
Collapse #14 Delivering therapeutic mAbs for COVID-19: What can be done in just one year? (On Demand)

Accelerating the timeline from biopharmaceutical discovery to clinical evaluation has long been a focus for industry. For potentially life-saving therapies, the earliest clinical testing enables accelerated pivotal trials and maximum patient benefit. In 2020, novel discovery and development strategies have rapidly evaluated antibodies for passive immunization or treatment of COVID-19, employing CMC timelines from lead identification to clinic cut in half. These strategies combine the latest advances in established platforms with acceptance of higher business risk or costs, while ensuring no increased patient risk. But speed to clinic for COVID-19 antibody therapies must be matched by speed to launch and immediate ramp-up in supply to realize a meaningful impact on the global pandemic. Parallel workflows must be initiated at the onset for process and product development as well as cGMP manufacturing. The initial focus on speed to clinic complements a slower approach to development of the most productive commercial cell line, efficient manufacturing process and optimal drug product configuration. Rapid production of initial clinical material followed by pivotal and commercial production arising from cell line, process and formulation optimization emphasizes the importance of product comparability, structure/function knowledge and appropriate control strategies. Meanwhile, scale-up and technology transfer to large manufacturing facilities starts before the first patient is dosed. These strategies impact the program’s technical and regulatory risk profiles, staff and capital resourcing, and set up trade-offs in multiple areas. This case study describes the development history of a COVID-19 antibody, reviewing CMC milestones from lead identification to preparation of the commercial license application as well as plans for post-licensure opportunities, all in one year.

Formats Available: On-Demand
Original Seminar Date: May 20, 2021
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
Register HereRegister Here #14 Delivering therapeutic mAbs for COVID-19: What can be done in just one year? (On Demand)
Collapse #15 Staying ahead of the virus: From a multispecies discovery strategy to highly efficacious, clinically suitable multi-antibody cocktails targeting SARS-CoV-2 (On Demand)

Whereas vaccines significantly contribute to halting transmission of SARS-CoV-2, they are not universally effective. Therapeutic antibodies can fill this gap to efficiently combat SARS-CoV-2. Obviously, long-lasting efficacy of anti-viral approaches heavily depends on the ability to protect against virus variants. As a multi-targeting strategy reduces the risk of mutagenic escape, we have isolated a diversified pool of anti-spike protein antibodies by leveraging our expertise to generate antibody libraries across multiple discovery platforms in different species, to eventually formulate a sensible therapeutic cocktail. A broad range of in vitro characterizations was applied to gain early insight into the epitope landscape and functional characteristics as well as developability profiles. This comprehensive, high-throughput characterization of the obtained lead candidate pool guided the rational combination of high value antibodies into multi-membered cocktails that unlock synergistic effects, significantly boosting neutralization potency in vitro. To accelerate further clinical development of our prioritized antibody cocktails, 2 individual components were subjected to in silico modeling-guided light molecular optimization to minimize liabilities, while in parallel, in vivo efficacy evaluation in a hamster challenge model validated efficient prevention and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection following administration of our prioritized antibody cocktails. Although we anticipate that a multi-targeting strategy is the best solution to reduce mutagenic risk escape, we continuously analyze binding of the antibodies of our lead pool for reactivity towards emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants empirically. To date, we screened our prioritized antibody cocktails towards spike protein of the S. African (B.1.351 lineage), Brazilian (P.1 lineage), UK (B.1.1.7 lineage), New York (B.1.526 lineage) and Californian (B.1.429 lineage) strains and confirmed retained binding. Our pandemic preparedness is further strengthened by the readily accessible, diverse pool of antibodies that we generated, which provides enormous possibilities for plug-and-play cocktails to address future SARS-CoV-2 variants.

Formats Available: On-Demand
Original Seminar Date: June 17, 2021
Register HereRegister Here #15 Staying ahead of the virus: From a multispecies discovery strategy to highly efficacious, clinically suitable multi-antibody cocktails targeting SARS-CoV-2 (On Demand)
Collapse #16 Antibody Fc Engineering: Designing Antibodies for Cancer, Covid-19, and Beyond (On Demand)

Monoclonal antibodies have become one of the most clinically successful therapeutic agents against a range of diseases, including cancer, autoimmune diseases, and most recently SARS-CoV-2. Although engagement of the antigen via the variable Fab portion of the antibody is essential, the function of many therapeutic antibodies also depends, to varying degrees, on the hinge and Fc portion of the antibody and the interaction with receptors on effector cells. Antibody subclass choice is crucial for optimal function and safety of therapeutic antibodies because the functional profile of each subclass differs greatly. Targeted modification of the Fc region and its associated glycan is also a potent and effective approach to tailor the therapeutic function of antibodies for the disease of choice, by improving or reducing the immune cell-associated effector functions and altering the circulating half-life of the antibody. One advantage of these Fc modifications is that they can be easily transferred to antibodies of any target, and so development of novel antibodies against a wide range of diseases have benefited from the modifications previously developed and characterized for different indications. 

Formats Available: On-Demand
Original Seminar Date: July 08, 2021
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
Register HereRegister Here #16 Antibody Fc Engineering: Designing Antibodies for Cancer, Covid-19, and Beyond (On Demand)
On Demand, Adaptive Immune Receptor Repertoires
Collapse Fundamentals of the Immune System, Part I:  Organization of the immune system (On Demand)

In this 2-part workshop on the fundamentals of the immune system, Dr. Jamie Scott will first provide an overview of humoral and cellular immunity, and the basic structure of the immune system, including its cells, tissues and compartments, along with the “superhighway” of the immune system: the circulatory and lymphatic systems. In that context, innate and adaptive immune systems and their interaction, and the general timing and dynamics of immune responses will be presented.

The processes of lymphocyte development, including the various B- and T-cell subsets, positive and negative selection, and the genetic basis of B-cell and T-cell receptor diversification, will be presented to provide a clear idea of what adaptive-immune receptor repertoires (AIRRs) are, and in general terms, how they are currently assessed via high-throughput sequencing.

Dr. Scott will then cover the signaling, activation, proliferation and differentiation of T-cell and B-cell clones in the context of lymphoid compartments where antigen is concentrated and presented to naïve and memory B and T cells. The role of co-stimulation in determining the type immune response generated will be emphasized.

In Part II, Dr. Scott will review the orchestration of systemic and mucosal immune responses, including the roles of tolerance and inflammation in these processes. Examples of immune responses to vaccines, chronic viral infection, and/or cancer, as well as autoimmunity, will be presented as variations on a common theme, reiterating the dynamics of the immune response. Some engineered immunotherapies, such as therapeutic antibodies, CAR-T cells and dendritic-cell vaccines, will be introduced as well.

The importance of AIRR-sequencing data to our understanding of immune responses will be emphasized throughout the latter half of this workshop.

Formats Available: On-Demand
Original Seminar Date: June 03, 2021
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
Register HereRegister Here Fundamentals of the Immune System, Part I:  Organization of the immune system (On Demand)
Collapse Fundamentals of the Immune System, Part II:  The immune system in action (On Demand)

In this 2-part workshop on the fundamentals of the immune system, Dr. Jamie Scott will first provide an overview of humoral and cellular immunity, and the basic structure of the immune system, including its cells, tissues and compartments, along with the “superhighway” of the immune system: the circulatory and lymphatic systems. In that context, innate and adaptive immune systems and their interaction, and the general timing and dynamics of immune responses will be presented. The processes of lymphocyte development, including the various B- and T-cell subsets, positive and negative selection, and the genetic basis of B-cell and T-cell receptor diversification, will be presented to provide a clear idea of what adaptive-immune receptor repertoires (AIRRs) are, and in general terms, how they are currently assessed via high-throughput sequencing.

Dr. Scott will then cover the signaling, activation, proliferation and differentiation of T-cell and B-cell clones in the context of lymphoid compartments where antigen is concentrated and presented to naïve and memory B and T cells. The role of co-stimulation in determining the type immune response generated will be emphasized.

In Part II, Dr. Scott will review the orchestration of systemic and mucosal immune responses, including the roles of tolerance and inflammation in these processes. Examples of immune responses to vaccines, chronic viral infection, and/or cancer, as well as autoimmunity, will be presented as variations on a common theme, reiterating the dynamics of the immune response. Some engineered immunotherapies, such as therapeutic antibodies, CAR-T cells and dendritic-cell vaccines, will be introduced as well. The importance of AIRR-sequencing data to our understanding of immune responses will be emphasized throughout the latter half of this workshop.

Formats Available: On-Demand
Original Seminar Date: June 15, 2021
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
Register HereRegister Here Fundamentals of the Immune System, Part II:  The immune system in action (On Demand)
Collapse Steps in data processing and analysis of adaptive immune receptor repertoires: best practices, pitfalls, and future directions (On Demand)

High-throughput sequencing has enabled the capture of adaptive immune receptor repertoire (AIRR) data at unprecedented depth and precision. This webinar will give an in-depth walk-through of best practices to conceive, analyze and perform AIRR studies for answering fundamental immunological questions as well as discovering novel immunodiagnostic biomarkers and design (therapeutic) immune receptors. Specifically, Dr. Greiff will address current approaches to perform AIRR-compliant AIRR data processing encompassing bulk and single-cell approaches and experimental and bioinformatics quality control. Furthermore, he will summarize the computational methods that have been recently developed to deconstruct the high-dimensional complexity of immune receptor repertoires, e.g., 1) diversity-, 2) phylogenetic-, 3) networks- and 4) machine learning-based methods that have been applied to dissect and understand the diversity, architecture, evolution and antigen specificity of immune repertoires. Finally, Dr. Greiff will discuss experimental and computational methods in light of their underlying assumptions, limitations and pitfalls and highlight promising avenues of future research in basic and applied AIRR systems immunology.

Formats Available: On-Demand
Original Seminar Date: April 06, 2021
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
Register HereRegister Here Steps in data processing and analysis of adaptive immune receptor repertoires: best practices, pitfalls, and future directions (On Demand)
Collapse The AIRR Community Data Commons: 4 billion reasons to store, analyze and share antibody/B-cell and T-cell receptor repertoire data (On Demand)

The adaptive immune system has evolved a unique molecular diversification mechanism designed to produce a highly diverse set of antigen receptors, necessary to recognize and remove the ever-changing array of pathogens an individual will encounter during their lifetime (e.g., novel coronaviruses). The sheer immensity of each individuals Adaptive Immune Receptor Repertoires (antibody/B-cell and T-cell sequences, or AIRR-seq data) present challenges for producing, storing, sharing, and analyzing these data. The AIRR Community is a group of immunogeneticists, bioinformaticians, and experts in ethics and legal issues of data sharing who joined together to develop standards and protocols for sharing and analyzing these data. Two products of the AIRR-C are the miAIRR standards for storing AIRR-seq data in a common format, and the AIRR Data Commons (ADC), a set of geographically distributed repositories of AIRR-seq data, all adopting these community standards. We are dedicated to the belief that sharing these AIRR-seq data through the AIRR Data Commons will greatly increase their utility for biomedical research and patient care.

The ADC Webinar will discuss the benefits to openly sharing and analyzing these data in an interoperable manner, including access to the >4 billion receptor rearrangements presently queryable through the ADC. We will present demos of how to add your data to the ADC, how to query data through VDJServer and the iReceptor Gateway and preview upcoming analysis tools and repositories being added to the ADC. We will include plenty of time for questions and answers from the audience, and look forward to explaining this ever-expanding resource to our community.

Formats Available: On-Demand
Original Seminar Date: May 04, 2021
Register HereRegister Here The AIRR Community Data Commons: 4 billion reasons to store, analyze and share antibody/B-cell and T-cell receptor repertoire data (On Demand)
On Demand, Antibodies to Watch
Collapse Antibodies to Watch in 2021 (On Demand)

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges to the biopharmaceutical industry. Initiating programs to discover and develop new antibodies that targeted SARS-CoV-2 was critical, but at the same time, programs bringing existing investigational therapies through late-stage clinical studies and regulatory review also needed to be maintained.

Dr. Janice Reichert (The Antibody Society) provides an update on antibody therapeutics approved in the US and European Union during 2020, those that may be approved by the end of 2021, and those that might enter regulatory review in the US or EU soon. She will also discuss current and potential emergency use authorizations for anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies.

Dr. Nick Hutchinson (FUJIFILM Diosynth Biotechnologies) discusses how the pandemic has driven scientists and engineers to find new ways to leverage antibody production capacity most effectively in order to meet the need for rapid early phase development, as well as high-demand commercial manufacturing and what this may mean for antibody manufacturing strategies in the future.

Formats Available: On-Demand, Live Webcast
Original Seminar Date: December 03, 2020
Register HereRegister Here Antibodies to Watch in 2021 (On Demand)
Collapse Antibodies to Watch in a Pandemic (On Demand)

The extraordinary scope and scale of the COVID-19 pandemic has elicited extraordinary responses world-wide. Organizations located across the globe have mobilized teams to research the SARS-CoV-2 virus and COVID-19, conduct clinical studies of repurposed biologics, and research and develop anti-SARS-CoV-2 biologics. Disruptions at companies and regulatory agencies, however, have raised concerns about the effects of the pandemic on possible approvals of non-COVID-19 antibody therapeutics. In a series of webinars, The Antibody Society will report on important developments in the commercial pipeline of antibody therapeutics for COVID-19, as well as other indications.

In “Antibodies to Watch in a Pandemic”, Dr. Janice Reichert (The Antibody Society) provides an update on non-COVID-19 antibody therapeutics approved in the first half of 2020, and those that might be approved by the end of the year. She also discusses the ~ 130 biologics currently in development for COVID-19, which includes over 50 repurposed biologics and over 80 anti-SARS-CoV-2 biologics. Additionally, Dr. Thomas Schirrmann (Yumab) presents a case study of how to develop anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in both academic and industrial settings.

Formats Available: On-Demand
Original Seminar Date: June 30, 2020
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
Register HereRegister Here Antibodies to Watch in a Pandemic (On Demand)
On Demand, Antibody Validation
Collapse  #1 - Antibody specificity? What
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

In this introduction to the topic, Professor Andreas Plückthun, University of Zürich, discusses the biology of the 3 principal types of commercial antibodies: polyclonal, monoclonal, and recombinant.  Surprisingly, only recombinants offer a reasonable hope of reproducibility in the long term – yet they remain very much the minority.

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: November 12, 2019
Register HereRegister Here  #1 - Antibody specificity? What
Collapse  #2 - Antibodies drive irreproducibility (On-Demand)
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

Professor Glenn Begley, Biocurate Pty Ltd, and Professor Cecilia Williams, KTH  Royal Institute of Technology, describe arduous, alarming and very costly experiences in failing to confirm “well established” critical data in oncology –a failure often driven by ineptly characterized antibodies.

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: November 13, 2019
Register HereRegister Here  #2 - Antibodies drive irreproducibility (On-Demand)
Collapse  #3 - What
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

Dr. Jan Voskuil, Aeonian Biotech, and Professor Andy Chalmers, University of Bath and CiteAb, delve into the mysterious world of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), which can veil the identity of antibodies, and data-base repositories that help unveil which antibody has produced reliable results.

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: December 04, 2019
Register HereRegister Here  #3 - What
Collapse  #4 - What is this Antibody? (On-demand)
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

Professor Anita Bandrowski, University California San Diego and SciCrunch, and Dr. Jan Voskuil, Aeonian Biotech, probe how antibody reagents are identified.  If we can’t identify which antibody has been used, we can never reproduce experiments.  The Research Reagent Identifier systematically tags antibodies so they can be tracked, but the small-print on the data-sheets still hides many things.

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: December 05, 2019
Register HereRegister Here  #4 - What is this Antibody? (On-demand)
Collapse  #5 - Really? Out of control(s)? (On-Demand)
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

Dr. Giovanna Roncador, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas and EuroMabNet, examinesthe criticality ofusing appropriate fit-for-purpose controls, both positive and negative, to validate antibodies in every experimental context.

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: January 15, 2020
Register HereRegister Here  #5 - Really? Out of control(s)? (On-Demand)
Collapse  #6 - Even the easy stuff isn
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

Professors Aldrin Gomes and James Trimmer, both from University of California, Davis, dissect two “basic” validation technologies, Western blot and immunohistochemistry, to expose the very many things that can distort validation data.

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: January 22, 2020
Register HereRegister Here  #6 - Even the easy stuff isn
Collapse  #7 - It
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

Dr. Travis Hardcastle, Horizon, and Dr. Alejandra Solache, Abcam, describe the character of different gene-knockout technologies, one of the strongest validation technologies, and their value in large-scale antibody screening. 

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: January 29, 2020
Register HereRegister Here  #7 - It
Collapse  #8 - Protein Arrays and Mass Spectrometry (On-Demand)
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

Dr. Mike Taussig, Cambridge Protein Arrays, and Dr. Fridtjof Lund-Johansen, Oslo University Hospital, look at array and immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry technologies, which offer a broader and deeper image of antibody specificity and selectivity for validation, than classical validation technologies.

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: February 05, 2020
Register HereRegister Here  #8 - Protein Arrays and Mass Spectrometry (On-Demand)
Collapse  #9 - Getting to Recombinant Antibodies that Guarantee Reproducible Research (On-Demand)
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

Dr. Andrew Bradbury, Specifica, suggests ways out of the validation maze by rigorous molecular identification of recombinant tool antibodies. This achievable goal could eliminate many of the shadowy issues described in this series of webinars.

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: February 12, 2020
Register HereRegister Here  #9 - Getting to Recombinant Antibodies that Guarantee Reproducible Research (On-Demand)
Collapse #10 - Specific Detection Reagents: What
The Antibody Society's Webcast series on Antibody Validation

Future recombinant binding tools may avoid antibodies, and use diversified libraries based on small and versatile protein scaffolds, for example the DARPins (Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins).  DARPins are single-chain, monodisperse, and non-immunogenic, and can be made rapidly and cheaply in bacteria in many formats.  They can also be expressed in and on cells as non-aggregating fusion proteins with tunable valencies, which opens a wide range of previously inaccessible approaches in cell biology and biochemistry.

Formats Available: On Demand
Original Seminar Date: February 19, 2020
Register HereRegister Here #10 - Specific Detection Reagents: What